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NCI - National Cancer Institute : How Monoclonal Antibodies Treat Cancer?

Updated: Mar 8


How Monoclonal Antibodies Treat Cancer?

Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody against CD38, molecules present on myeloma cancer cells.


NCI - National Cancer Institute : How Monoclonal Antibodies Treat Cancer?


 

Monoclonal Antibodies and Their Side Effects (www.cancer.org)


One way the body's immune system attacks foreign substances is by making large numbers of antibodies. An antibody is a protein that sticks to a specific protein called an antigen. Antibodies circulate throughout the body until they find and attach to the antigen. Once attached, they can force other parts of the immune system to destroy the cells containing the antigen.


Researchers can design antibodies that specifically target a certain antigen, such as one found on cancer cells. They can then make many copies of that antibody in the lab. These are known as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs or Moabs).


Learn more:

https://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatments-and-side-effects/treatment-types/immunotherapy/monoclonal-antibodies.html


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